Entrar/Registro  
HOME SPANISH
 
Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social
   
MENU

Contents by Year, Volume and Issue

Table of Contents

General Information

Instructions for Authors

Message to Editor

Editorial Board






>Journals >Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social >Year 2009, Issue 1


Quiñonez-Alvarado MG, Villaseñor-Sierra A
Spread of S. pyogenes to the Caretakers and Relatives from Nasopharyngeal Carrier Children Attended in a Day Care Center
Rev Med Inst Mex Seguro Soc 2009; 47 (1)

Language: Español
References: 29
Page: 83-88
PDF: 210.51 Kb.


Full text




ABSTRACT

Objective: to evaluate the prevalence of nasopharyngeal S. pyogenes (SP) carriers among children attending a day care center (DCC) and the spread of specific clones (SC) among caretakers and relatives.
Methods: nasopharyngeal cultures were performed in children with SP positive culture (306), family members (51) and caretakers (73) at time-0, four and seven months later. Differences among SP strains were determined. Descriptive statistics and Fisher exact test were performed.
Results: SP prevalence in carrier children, caretakers and relatives was 10, 0 and 4 %. Three pairs of children, from two different classrooms, shared SP strains SC I, II and III. A clone VII was isolated from a relative. In the second survey, the SP prevalence was 4, 0 and 0 %. Two classmates shared clone I and other two from a different classroom shared clone V. In the third, the prevalence was 2, 4 and 14 %. Strains of clones II and VII were isolated from children. A sister of one child, who did not attend to DCC, was a carrier of clone II found in her brother. Clone III was isolated in one caretaker.
Conclusions: the SP carrier prevalence was similar to other reports. The sharing of identical clones of SP was found among children in close physical contact.


Key words: S. pyogenes, child day care centers, nasopharyngeal diseases.


REFERENCIAS

  1. Stevens DL. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci: virulence factors, pathogenesis, and spectrum of clinical infections. En: Stevens DL, Kaplan EL, editors. Streptococcal infections. Clinical aspects, microbiology and molecular pathogenesis. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2000. p. 19-36.

  2. Yagupsky P, Landau D, Beck A, Dagan R. Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes among infants and toddlers attending day-care facilities in closed communities in Southern Israel. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 1995;14(1):54-58.

  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Outbreak of invasive group A Streptococcus associated with varicella in a childcare center-Boston, Massachusetts, 1997. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 1997;46(40):944-948.

  4. Saxén H, Muotiala A, Rostila T, Vuopio-Varkila J. Outbreak of perianal Streptococcus pyogenes infection in a day-care center. Pediatr Infect Dis J 1997;16(2):247-249.

  5. Hsueh PR, Teng LJ, Lee PI, Yang PC, Huang LM, Chang SC, et al. Outbreak of scarlet fever at a hospital day care centre: analysis of strain relatedness with phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. J Hosp Infect 1997;36(3):191- 200.

  6. Smith TD, Wilkinson V, Kaplan EL. Group A streptococcus associated upper respiratory tract infections in a day-care center. Pediatrics 1989; 83(3):380-384.

  7. Engelgau MM, Woernle CH, Schwartz B, Vance NJ, Horan JM. Invasive group A streptococcus carriage in a child care centre after a fatal case. Arch Dis Child 1994;71(4):318-322.

  8. Ichiyama S, Nakashima K, Shimokata K, Ohta M, Shimizu Y, Ooe K, et al. Transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes causing toxic shock-like syndrome among family members and confirmation by DNA macrorestriction analysis. J Infect Dis 1997; 175(3):723-726.

  9. Gamba MA, Martinelli M, Schaad HJ, Streuli RA, DiPersio J, Matter L, et al. Familial transmission of a serious disease producing group A streptococcus clone: case reports and review. Clin Infect Dis 1997; 24(6):1118-1121.

  10. Perry RF, Maher MT. Management of pharyngeal carriers of group A streptococcal organisms. JAMA 1997;277(15):1203-1204.

  11. Krause RM, Rammelkamp CH Jr. Studies of the carrier state following infection with group A streptococci. II. Infectivity of streptococci isolated during acute pharyngitis and during the carrier state. J Clin Invest 1962;41:575-578.

  12. Hamburger MG, Hamburger VJ. The problem of the dangerous carrier of hemolytic streptococci II. Spread of infection by individuals with strongly positive nose cultures who expelled large numbers of hemolytic streptococci. J Infect Dis 1945; 77:68-81.

  13. Kaplan EL. The group A streptococcal upper respiratory tract carrier state: an enigma. J Pediatr 1980; 97(3):337-345.

  14. Gardiner DL, Goodfellow AM, Martin DR, Sriprakash KS. Group A streptococcal Vir types are M-protein gene (emm) sequence type specific. J Clin Microbiol 1998;36(4):902-907.

  15. Gardiner DL, Sriprakash KS. Molecular epidemiology of impetiginous group A streptococcal infections in aboriginal communities of Northern Australia. J Clin Microbiol 1996;34(6):1448-1452.

  16. Podbielski A, Flosdorff A, Weber-Heynemann J. The group A streptococcal virR49 gene controls expression of four structural vir regulon genes. Infect Immunol 1995;63(1):9-20.

  17. Hong K. Characterization of group A streptococcal strains Sv and Su: determination of emm gene typing and presence of small Vir regulon. Res Microbiol 2000;151(1):29-36.

  18. Surdeanu M, Shundi L, Straut M. Molecular subtyping of group A streptococcal strains based on virulence regulon polymorphism. Roum Arch Microbiol Immunol 2000;59(1-2):89-102.

  19. Johnson DR, Kaplan EL, Sramek J, Bicova R, Havlickova H, Motlova J. Specimen collection and transportation. En: Laboratory diagnosis of group A streptococcal infections. Minneapolis, MN, USA: World Health Organization; 1996. p. 4-10.

  20. Johnson DR, Kaplan EL, Sramek J, Bicova R, Havricek, J, Havlickova H, et al. Culture, recognition and storage. En: Laboratory diagnosis of group A streptococcal infections. Minneapolis, MN, USA: World Health Organization; 1996. p. 11-22.

  21. Gardiner D, Hartas J, Currie B, Mathews JD, Kemp DJ, Sriprakash KS. Vir typing: a long-PCR typing method for group A streptococci. PCR Methods Appl 1995;4(5):288-293.

  22. Hartas J, Hibble M, Sriprakash KS. Simplification of a locus-specific DNA typing method (Vir typing) for Streptococcus pyogenes. J Clin Microbiol 1998; 36(5):1428-1429.

  23. Chassy BM. A gentle method for the lysis of oral streptococci. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1976;68(2):603-608.

  24. Pichichero ME, Marsocci SM, Murphy ML, Hoeger W, Green JL, Sorrento A. Incidence of streptococcal carriers in private pediatric practice. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1999;153(6):624-628.

  25. Yagupsky P, Landau D, Beck A, Dagan R. Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes among infants and toddlers attending day-care facilities in closed communities in Southern Israel. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 1995;14(1):54-58.

  26. Nguyen L, Levy D, Ferroni A, Gehanno P, Berche P. Molecular epidemiology of Streptococcus pyogenes in an area where acute pharyngotonsillitis is endemic. J Clin Microbiol 1997;35(8): 2111- 2114.

  27. Villaseñor-Sierra A, Quiñonez-Alvarado MG, Caballero-Hoyos JR. Interpersonal relationships and group A streptococcus spread in a Mexican day-care center. Salud Publica Mex 2007;49(5): 323-329.

  28. Cockerill FR 3rd, MacDonald KL, Thompson RL, Roberson F, Kohner PC, Besser-Wiek J, et al. An outbreak of invasive group A streptococcal disease associated with high carriage rates of the invasive clone among school-aged children. JAMA 1997;277(1):38-43.

  29. The Working Group on Prevention of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infections. Prevention of invasive group A streptococcal disease among household contacts of case-patients: is prophylaxis warranted? JAMA 1998;279(15):1206-1210.






>Journals >Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social >Year 2009, Issue 1
 

· Journal Index 
· Links 






       
Copyright 2019