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>Journals >Cirujano General >Year 2007, Issue 1


Romero HA, Soto MMA, Pérez CF, Ponce LFJ, Ramírez BJ, Guízar SDP, Santibáñez OC
Surgery at the Renacentist University of Bologna
Cir Gen 2007; 29 (1)

Language: Español
References: 18
Page: 63-69
PDF: 4. Kb.


Full text




ABSTRACT

Objective: To know the organization and the faculties of the renacentist University of Bologna and the contributions of its surgeons to universal medicine.
Design: Historical analysis of primary and secondary literature sources on the University.
Setting: Seminar of European Humanism and Novo-Hispanic Culture of the graduate program directed by Dr. Enrique González González at the School of Philosophy and Arts (UNAM).
Results: An Italian University had at least six to eight professors teaching civil law, cannonical law, medicine, logics, natural philosophy, and usually rhetoric. Italy had 16 universities between 1400 and 1601. Bologna was the first.
The decision of the city hall to take away from the students the control of the university, by paying the professors, was the most important decision in the history of the Italian universities. In 1370-1371, there were eleven law professors, seven of canonical law, three of theoretical medicine, two of practical medicine, one professor of surgery, and one of medicine and natural philosophy. In 1388-1389, there were 15 professors of canonical law, 18 of civil law, 16 for medicine and surgery, and five for natural philosophy.
Conclusion: The School of Arts and Medicine had approximately 18 professors of theoretical medicine, 5 of practical medicine, and 5 of surgery. Gaspare Tagliacozzi obtained his medical degree in Bologna in 1570, he was a pioneer in reconstructive plastic surgery. In the XVI Century, Bologna had the largest number of professors and, probably, the largest amount of students among the Italian universities.


Key words: History of Medicine, Medieval Universities, Bologna, Curriculum in Medicine.


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>Journals >Cirujano General >Year 2007, Issue 1
 

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